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Beatriz at dinner – An empath in post trump era !

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I think Beatriz at dinner is one of the first films in the post-Trump era, focusing on how an empathetic person feels. We should let people know that it’s ok to be empathetic.
The beauty of watching a movie is by entering into a cinema hall without any burden of liking it or not, as I don’t know much about the filmmaker Miguel Arteta.
Beatriz at dinner, a film I even not heard of yesterday, I was not familiar with the director and writer, the first film of Salma Hayek I ever watched, today, I was mesmerized by watching it.

Check the trailer in link below –

Beatriz at dinner Official Trailer
Without quoting all the beautiful one liners on the internet about this film, In simple language, Beatriz is a story of a Mexican immigrant in California, an immigrant, just like most of the population today are, but she… she is an empath… in a non-empath world. The film follows enigmatic, elegiac Salma Hayek, her journey as a mystic healer from her neglected house bursting with the barks and cheers of animals, to her job at a Santa Monica alternative cancer center, reaching to a dinner night at the County home of a wealthy client, Cathy. (Connie Britton). where she is invited but, not welcomed.

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The dinner hosts are Cathy and Grant (Connie Britton, David Warshofsky), whose daughter Beatriz once helped through a bout with cancer. The daughter is now off at university and mom ( Connie Britton ) is now taking massage therapies from Beatriz.
At dinner, another couple in the house is (Chloë Sevigny and Jay Duplass) who are shameless social climbers, make the party slutty, funny and desperate. But it’s not an easy ride.
It’s a subtle, sharp and sublime take on the contemporary times. With pinches of humor, surrealism, and emotions, Beatriz is not a regular American movie.
“Beatriz at Dinner” is written by Mike White. This is Mike and Miguel’s third movie together, after “Chuck & Buck” (2000) and “The Good Girl” (2002), in both of which they refined the art of making an audience jiggle. This smooth, crisp 83-minute dark comedy of different mannerisms, move around characters who do not “belong” at the same gathering. They do not, in fact, appear to belong in the same country. White wrote “Beatriz at Dinner” two years ago, before the establishment of Donald Trump, the current president. The movie, however, feels more like written for the contemporary times. But, it reflects the past too.
It has a satirical approach towards all the contemporary political and social problems whether it’s dying, killing animals, illegal migrations, destroying environment etc.
All the actors perform their part really well.

The way Hayek’s chose to play this character — as a kind of haunted healer — lends itself to some surreal witty moments. Chloë Sevigny and Jay Duplass as a younger, careerist couple bring a fresh and realistic approach to their characters.

John Lithgow, who portrayed a kind of metaphor of President Trump, make the film interesting and witty.

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John Lithgow on How His Character Differs from Trump in ‘Beatriz at Dinner
Beatriz at Dinner may look like ending abruptly, but its central clash between healers and destroyers maintains its power long after the credits have rolled.
who we are and Why are we here? What difference can we make? These questions that Beatriz takes seriously. And they will resonate with anyone who has ever considered the troubled state of humanity and felt a deep solitude and grief. The movie’s disturbing conclusion is that the world is full of Doug Strutts ( greatly played by John Lithgow ) And as satisfying as it might be to call them to account, they never really go away.

 

  • Gursimran Datla
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